Easter outfit (plus wet hair.)

Easter outfit (plus wet hair.)

jojoseames:

Happy Easter, everyone!
ink n’ digital, 8x10 inchesJoJo Seames, 2014
(Prints available!)

jojoseames:

Happy Easter, everyone!

ink n’ digital, 8x10 inches
JoJo Seames, 2014

(Prints available!)

Happy Easter, everyone!
ink n’ digital, 8x10 inchesJoJo Seames, 2014
(Prints available!)

Happy Easter, everyone!

ink n’ digital, 8x10 inches
JoJo Seames, 2014

(Prints available!)

this brush pen is my favorite pen of all the pens

this brush pen is my favorite pen of all the pens

Easter cookie.

Easter cookie.

About 40% of my writing process is thinking up little conversational vignettes like this and hoping I can string them together into something coherent.
20% is choreographing action sequences, which is the part that is fun and rewarding.
30% is deciding that I hate everything I’ve written and totally re-doing the dialogue in the lettering stage because at least I can change that much.
10% is general regret.
Anyway. MM has the occasional moment of epiphany, when he’s not fighting against them for all he’s worth.
JoJo Seames, 2014

About 40% of my writing process is thinking up little conversational vignettes like this and hoping I can string them together into something coherent.

20% is choreographing action sequences, which is the part that is fun and rewarding.

30% is deciding that I hate everything I’ve written and totally re-doing the dialogue in the lettering stage because at least I can change that much.

10% is general regret.

Anyway. MM has the occasional moment of epiphany, when he’s not fighting against them for all he’s worth.

JoJo Seames, 2014

postcardsfromspace:

I wish I’d had like 8000 words for this, because Carol Corps blows my mind. It’s the first time I’ve seen a truly positive-sum fan community—a group that is all about sharing the joy and inspiration they get from this character, and celebrating the myriad of ways people find to engage with her. Fan after fan told me that they’d gotten into Captain Marvel because someone else called, lent them books, told them how much the character and community had grown to mean, and invited them in.

Look: I love the hell out of Carol Danvers and Kamala Khan, but they’re not why I finally bought myself some Optimystical dog tags at that show: Carol Corps is what inspires me again and again to keep caring about superhero comics, to believe they—and the community around them—can change for the better, and to hold them to that standard. You guys take my breath away.

A late-night Superman sketch. :)
JoJo Seames, 2014

A late-night Superman sketch. :)

JoJo Seames, 2014

New painting! It is Jessica Drew, the Spider-Woman! I’ve always been fond of her. Despite the whole raised-by-HYDRA-and-sometimes-replaced-by-Skrulls, she’s always struck me as such a cute, fun character. Her costume presented something of a challenge, but I hope I rendered her in a way that isn’t too lascivious. 
(Original is available for sale!)
Watercolor, 9x12 inchesJoJo Seames, 2014

New painting! It is Jessica Drew, the Spider-Woman! I’ve always been fond of her. Despite the whole raised-by-HYDRA-and-sometimes-replaced-by-Skrulls, she’s always struck me as such a cute, fun character. Her costume presented something of a challenge, but I hope I rendered her in a way that isn’t too lascivious.

(Original is available for sale!)

Watercolor, 9x12 inches
JoJo Seames, 2014

Drew another dragony dude. This guy’s name is Sorazithabner, and he has a keen eye for detail.
Related: O’sollonggo, Iasharlunthene, Iaqiu’ko
(Prints available!)
Ink n’ Digital, 10x13 inchesJoJo Seames, 2014

Drew another dragony dude. This guy’s name is Sorazithabner, and he has a keen eye for detail.

Related: O’sollonggo, Iasharlunthene, Iaqiu’ko

(Prints available!)

Ink n’ Digital, 10x13 inches
JoJo Seames, 2014

After "Don't rape" and "Don't threaten rape" what's the best way for men to improve the lives of women and girls in geekdom?
Anonymous

postcardsfromspace:

Okay, look: “Don’t rape” and “don’t threaten rape” are pinpoint-specific parts of social compact, also known as “the bare minimum expectations for getting to be part of society.”

These are things that should be taken as a given. Don’t hold up ”don’t rape” and “don’t threaten rape” like they are gifts.

I mean, don’t do those things, and deter others from doing them, and talk about all of this, but, fuck, man.

Anyway.

The best way men can improve the lives of women and girls in geekdom is to do their damnedest to shift the balance of power. Geek dudes—especially white geek dudes—you have something the ladies do not: you have a platform from which to speak about issues of justice with relative impunity. Use it. Better yet, share it with or give it to someone who does not have that privilege.

Are you a pro on a panel that’s all white dudes? Give up your seat to a woman of color. Encourage other panelists to do the same. Straight-up refuse to be part of panels that do not work toward equal representation. Hold speaker and guest lists at cons to the same standard. And talk about what you are doing, and why.

If you are in a position that gives you hiring power, hire women—especially into positions where they will have power, not just low-level editorial and work-for-hire gigs. Actively seek and use the input of women, and go out of your way to make really damn sure they’re credited for those contributions

Seek and vocally advocate for works by and about women, for female-friendly and generally diversity-friendly publishers, retailers, and fan communities. When someone does shit right, vote with your dollars and spread the word. When someone fucks up, call them out, and—if there’s any real potential for it and you’ve got the capacity—offer them impetus for and tools to change.

Buy girl books. Buy books with pink covers, and read them in public. Break down the box of geek masculinity, and live the geek culture you want to see and be part of. Subvert everything.

Meanwhile: Hold other men accountable. Don’t tell rape jokes. Call out bullshit.

And respect the anger of those of us who have been consistently marginalized. If you want to be an ally in this fight, recognize that the fight is not about you: sometimes solidarity means giving other people space to be frustrated and angry at a system from which you directly benefit, and sometimes that means that they will, by extension, be angry at you—and that this, along with everything else, means *that system* is your common enemy.

Speaking of systems: Educate yourself. Read How to Suppress Women’s Writing and call that shit out. Understand that in this fight, your voice is generally considered to mean more than mine. Fight that inequality as hard as you can—but meanwhile, while you’ve got that platform, use it.

fuckyesnorthdakota:

AWWWWYEAAAAHHH

calamityjon:

Ulisas Farinas has written a pair of impassioned articles about the normalization of depictions of violence against women in comics and, more recently, underlining the self-delusion inherent in the recent posturing made in response to the rape threats against Janelle Asselin, a comics culture writer who had the temerity to criticize a Teen Titans comic book cover for being dumb (heads up, True Believers, those comics are dumb!)

It’s an undisciplined but honest pair of articles, and he makes some thoughtful points, like 

As an adult, I see men all around me, who write violence, who draw violence, who have never been infected (sic) by violence. Most women you know, have been victims of some sort of violence from a man. But where is Batman and the battered woman? Where is Captain America and the saddest conversation you can have with a girlfriend? Where is all the heartache, the pain, the disgust and the powerlessness?

And on the … well, christ, on the pointlessness of trying to shame bad behavior out of folks…

A man tells a woman he’ll rape her because its the only thing left where he can still have power. You ain’t gonna shame no dude into stop doing that. Shame is exactly why he does it. Dude knows exactly how offensive he is being. And if it offends his dude friends? They think, “That’s cause they’re little bitches too, so fuck them. I bet they can’t get laid, so they just pretend to be feminists to hang out with chicks.”

They don’t know what rape is, except from what they’ve learned from TV, comics and movies. They know that its extremely shocking, and so they can always rely on it to end the conversation.

As a reward for writing these articles, Ulisas been gifted with a lovely bouquet of “UNH ACTUALLY MEN GET RAPED TOO YOU KNOW!” responses, with such suddenness and ferocity that you’d think these guys were competing for the Gold in Missing the Point (I suppose I can inoculate myself against the same thing by adding: he never said they didn’t). He’s been given the greatest gift of all, being proven right by nimrods.

You know that joke - a woman is crying because she’s just received word that her sister and nieces died in a boating accident, and a guy walking by interrupts her; “Uh, excuse me, but men drown too, you know.”

Why Comics Can’t Grow Up Until We Do

multiversitycomics:

image

And if we, as the fans of the medium, can’t even deal with each others opinions about comics without threatening to kill, rape or publicly embarrass each other, then how do we expect comics to continue to survive or, god forbid, to grow?”

MC Editor David Harper looks at the recent experience of Janelle Asselin, and how the actions of “fans” of comics negatively impact the growth and potential of this medium and industry.

Read the full piece here.